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4010 Tractor

Bobby I have JD 4010 diesel that starts quickly with a small amt of ether when cold. After running for about 30 minutes if you turn the engine off it will not start again untill the motor is cold. If you tow it and pop the clutch it will start right up when hot.
Any suggestions on what is wrong and how to correct.

Leonard The first thing I would make sure of is the fuel filters and fuel system. Look for the simple things first. Check your air filter also. If all of this checks out then here is my opinion. Your 4010 has probably got a lot of hours on it so a couple of things are most likely to be your problem. The first I would suspect is your starter or your electrical system from your batteries all the way through the solenoid on your starter and then the starter itself. This system should be checked thoroughly. You need to make sure you have a good electrical system. Older Deere engines require a quick whip over while starting. Mainly because the top compression ring on your pistons is about five eighths of an inch from the top of your piston. If your starter is the least bit draggy or slow in cranking, your engine will be hard to start. When you let the engine cool down your compression will build quicker and thus the easier start up while cold and the reason it will tow start. You are turning the engine over quicker when you tow it and pop the clutch.
The other thing I would suspect is the compression on your engine. If your engine is worn, namely the compression rings, pistons and the cylinder walls. Your valves could also be suspect in this. Older Deere engines if well maintained will usually get you about eight to ten thousand hours before they need to be overhauled. If your engine has been in adverse conditions or has been poorly maintained then the hours will be a lot less than that. I hope this helps and good luck with your tractor. 4010s are awesome tractors. So don't give up on it.

Bobby Thanks for the info.


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